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Sherds (“fragments of pottery” or "potsherds") is a 2007 short novel or novelette written by Filipino National Artist for Literature[1] and multi-awarded[2] author F. Sionil José. According to Elmer A. Ordoñez, a writer from The Manila Times, in Sherds José achieved “lyrical effects”, specially in the novel’s final chapters, by putting into “good use” Joseph Conrad’s and Ford Madox Ford’s so-called progression d’effet (literally "progression....
Published 2007
Vibora! (literally meaning "Viper!") is a 2007 novel written by Filipino National Artist F. Sionil José. The novel narrates the life of an accidental hero, Benjamin Singkol, during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines after escaping from Bataan during the Second World War. Singkol in turn narrates the life of Artemio "Vibora" Ricarte whose identity is being questioned: whether a patriot or a collaborator to the Japanese occupiers.
Published 2007
Ben Singkol is a 2001 novel written by Filipino National Artist F. Sionil José. It is about Benjamin "Ben" Singkol, who is described as “perhaps the most interesting character” created by the author. Based on José's novel, Singkol is a renowned novelist who wrote the book entitled "Pain", an autobiography written during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Through the fictional novel Singkol recalled the hardships experienced by the F....
Published 2001
Viajero, Spanish for "The Wanderer"[1] or "The Traveller", is a 1993 English-language novel written by multi-award winning Filipino author F. Sionil José.[2] The literary theme is about the constant search of the Filipino people for “social justice and moral order”. [3] Viajero is one of the literary representatives embodying the fulfillment of the Filipinos' "emergent-nationalism".[1]
Published 1993
Gagamba (meaning “spider”), subtitled The Spider Man, is a novel by award-winning and most widely translated[1][2] Filipino author F. Sionil José. The novel is about a Filipino male cripple nicknamed “Gagamba”, a vendor of sweepstakes tickets in Ermita, Manila. After being buried in the wreckage, the seller survives an earthquake, together with two other fortunate characters, that occurred in the Philippines in the middle of July 1990.[3] Th....
Published 1991
Ermita: A Filipino Novel is a novel by the known Filipino author F. Sionil Jose written in the English language.[1]
Published 1988
Po-on A Novel is a novel written by Francisco Sionil José, a Filipino English-language writer. This is the original title when it was first published in the Philippines in the English language. In the United States, it was published under the title Dusk A Novel. For this novel's translation into Tagalog, the title Po-on Isang Nobela – a direct translation of Po-on A Novel - was adopted.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]
Published 1984
Tree is a 1978 historical novel by Filipino National Artist F. Sionil José. A story of empathy and subjugation, it is the second in José’s series known as The Rosales Saga or the Rosales Novels.[1][2] The tree in the novel is a representation of the expectations and dreams of Filipinos.
Published 1978
Mass, also known as Mass: A Novel, is a 1973 historical and political novel written by Filipino National Artist F. Sionil José.[1] Together with The Pretenders, the Mass is the completion of José’s The Rosales Saga,[2][3] which is also known as the Rosales Novels.[4] The literary message of Mass was "a society intent only on calculating a man's price is one that ultimately devalues all men".[3]
Published 1973
My Brother, My Executioner[1] is a novel by Filipino author Francisco Sionil José written in Philippine English. A part of the so-called Rosales Saga - a series of five interconnected fiction novels - My Brother, My Executioner ranks third in terms of chronology. In the United States, My Brother, My Executioner was published as a second part of the book, Don Vicente, together with Tree, another novel which is also a part of José’s Rosales Sa....
Published 1973

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F. Sionil José or in full Francisco Sionil José (born December 3, 1924) is one of the most widely-read Filipino writers in the English language. His novels and short stories depict the social underpinnings of class struggles and colonialism in Filipino society. José's works - written in English - have been translated into 22 languages, including Korean, Indonesian, Russian, Latvian, Ukrainian and Dutch.[1][2][3][4][5][6]
Created by cronos on Jul 12, 2011
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