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Harriot Eaton Stanton Blatch (January 20, 1856 – November 20, 1940) was an American writer and suffragist and the daughter of pioneering women's rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Child Death 20 Nov 1940
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States.[1]
Death 26 Oct 1902
Gerrit Smith (March 6, 1797 – December 28, 1874) was a leading United States social reformer, abolitionist, politician, and philanthropist. He was an unsuccessful candidate for President of the United States in 1848, 1852, and 1856.
Relative Death 28 Dec 1874
Daniel Cady (April 29, 1773 – October 31, 1859 Johnstown, Fulton County, New York) was a prominent lawyer and judge in upstate New York. While perhaps better known today as the father of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Judge Cady had a full and accomplished life of his own.
Parent Death 1859
Harriot Eaton Stanton Blatch (January 20, 1856 – November 20, 1940) was an American writer and suffragist and the daughter of pioneering women's rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Child Birth 20 Jan 1856
Colonel James Livingston (March 27, 1747 – March 9, 1832) was born in the French province of Canada to New York-born parents. He was living in Quebec (as Canada was known following the French and Indian War) when the American Revolutionary War broke out. He was responsible for raising and leading the 1st Canadian Regiment of the Continental Army during the invasion of Canada, and continued to serve in the war until 1781. He retired to Sarato....
Relative Death 1832
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States.[1]
Birth 12 Nov 1815
Gerrit Smith (March 6, 1797 – December 28, 1874) was a leading United States social reformer, abolitionist, politician, and philanthropist. He was an unsuccessful candidate for President of the United States in 1848, 1852, and 1856.
Relative Birth 6 Mar 1797
Daniel Cady (April 29, 1773 – October 31, 1859 Johnstown, Fulton County, New York) was a prominent lawyer and judge in upstate New York. While perhaps better known today as the father of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Judge Cady had a full and accomplished life of his own.
Parent Birth 1773
Colonel James Livingston (March 27, 1747 – March 9, 1832) was born in the French province of Canada to New York-born parents. He was living in Quebec (as Canada was known following the French and Indian War) when the American Revolutionary War broke out. He was responsible for raising and leading the 1st Canadian Regiment of the Continental Army during the invasion of Canada, and continued to serve in the war until 1781. He retired to Sarato....
Relative Birth 1747

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States.[1]
Created by cronos on Jul 12, 2011
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